FAQ: Polarised Representation

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The questions and answers in this FAQ relate to the policy proposal set out in our page on Polarised Representation.

  1. Aren’t most of the policies of the main parties broadly similar? How much polarity is there really?
  2. How will it be determined what is ‘conservative’ and what is ‘progressive’? Things like the NHS might be obvious, but what about education, for example? Wouldn’t both sides claim that?
  3. How will this reform fit in with Local Sovereignty’s other reforms, in particular the proposal to make members of the House of Lords representatives of local government?

Aren’t most of the policies of the main parties broadly similar? How much polarity is there really?

The polarity is only present in some of the functions of government, perhaps 25% or so, but it tends to determine which party gains power. Hardcore party members are wedded to particular positions about that small percentage of issues, and they’re the ones prospective MPs have to satisfy in order to be nominated. Those issues therefore skew policy on everything else because, under the current system, the only way for them to get control on the issues they are so concerned about is for them to get control of everything else as well.

For the most part, those different policy areas compete with each other for resources but don’t actively conflict with each other so there’s no need for the same people to have control of them.

How will it be determined what is ‘conservative’ and what is ‘progressive’? Things like the NHS might be obvious, but what about education, for example? Wouldn’t both sides claim that?
How will this reform fit in with Local Sovereignty’s other reforms, in particular the proposal to make members of the House of Lords representatives of local government?

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